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Upcoming KC Dementia Friendly Events

Please join us for these upcoming KC Dementia Friendly events, specially created for people who are living with dementia and their family, friends, and care partners.

All are welcome.

Click to view informative and inspiring short videos on our YouTube channel

Deborah Shouse is the author of Connecting in the Land of Dementia: Creative Activities to Explore Together and Love in the Land of Dementia: Finding Hope in the Caregiver’s Journey.

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Musing Together: Looking at Art  Expands Skills, Increases Socialization, and Widens Horizons

The group pauses in front of a large contemporary sculpture, depicting a preacher standing before his congregation at a small country church.  They walk around the piece, noticing the pews, the organist, and the variety of parishioners, and chatting as they view. Then they settle into chairs and co-facilitator Esther Smith asks: “What is one word that comes to mind when you look at this piece of art.”

 

“Boring,’ says one woman.

“What makes it boring?” Esther asks.

“It brings me back to my childhood, when I was stuck in church for hours,” she answers. “I was so bored.”

A few others nod. Someone asks, “When was this made? Where is it from?” and the conversation about the art continues.

Every month at the High Museum in Atlanta, Georgia, Teaching Artist Esther Smith guides a group of care partners and people living with dementia on a 90-minute gallery exploration called Musings Together. 

“It’s a light-hearted, interactive experience,” Esther says. “We go at a slow pace, seeing only three to four works each time. We want people to have a comfortable, personalized experience with art.”

The open-ended conversation brings out people’s stories and ideas. Sitting in front of Giovanni Bellini’s Madona and Child, Esther asks, “What lines do you notice in this painting? Trace them in the air with your hand.”

After people trace their lines, she asks, “What line was most interesting to you?” That question might lead into a discussion of what makes this painting different. Then Esther might invite the group to pose like the picture. She might say, “How would that baby’s head feel in your hand?”

“These simple prompts launch us into deep conversations,” Esther says. She and her team are experimenting with expanding the sensory experience, including bringing out oranges when they’re gazing at a still life of fruit and letting each guest hold and examine the orange. Esther also invites people to occasionally sketch an aspect of a drawing that appeals to them, using a drawing pad on a clipboard. 

“ A number of our participants have never been regular museum-goers. Now they feel comfortable here and come more often,” Esther says. “Developing a new community of friends and an expanding interest in art enriches their lives.”    #

Want to look at art with someone who is living with dementia?

If you’re visiting a museum, focus on a gallery with 3-4 large and interesting pieces. Ask a docent for advice, if needed. If you’re at home, give yourself plenty to time to comfortably view a few works of art on-line or in books. 

  • Bring a folding chair, so you can sit.
  • Chose a time of day when your partner is energetic and the gallery is relatively quiet.
  • Have fun just noticing the aspects of the piece. You might invite comments on colors, textures, familiar figures, objects that seem odd to you, and other aspects. 
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as, “What does this piece make you think of?” “What do you like about this piece?” “How do you think that main guy feels?” 

When attention wanes, move onto something else, including a lovely coffee or tea break.   

Click to view informative and inspiring short videos on our YouTube channel

Deborah Shouse is the author of Connecting in the Land of Dementia: Creative Activities to Explore Together and Love in the Land of Dementia: Finding Hope in the Caregiver’s Journey.

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A Dream Came True at The Red Ballon Movies & Memories

“I wish I had a red balloon,” one of our guests said, after the inspiring ending of the short film, The Red Balloon. Moments later, the dream came true. Each guest was offered a buoyant scarlet balloon, the magical symbol of a meaningful film.

The Movies & Memories program now has a new time and date: the first Wednesday of each month from 10:30-12:00. 

        

 

 

As guests enter the lower level of the Plaza Library, they breathe in the enticing aroma of fresh popcorn. Soon, they are settled in comfortable chairs and munching on popcorn and cookies, while being serenaded.  They sing along with Richelle Basgall, who engages them with fiddle, guitar, kazoo, and more. They tap their feet and clap their hands, belting out favorite folk songs and old standards, such as  Ol’ Suzanna, Que Sera Sera,  and I’ve Been Working on the Railroad.

Then the lights lower and everyone watches intently as a young boy and his red balloon form a deep bond, and stick together, despite many obstacles.  People were still talking about the movie as they and their balloons trail down the hallway, heading towards home.

Get a taste of The Red Balloon movie event by clicking here. 

 

Many thanks to our wonderful volunteers, including Sharon, Julie, and Pam. And special thanks to Sharon and Elizabeth from Stonecrest for bringing delicious snacks for us.

Our next movie experience is on July 3rd. Please join us for Room on the Broom, and other short films, a celebration of diversity.  You’ll love the songs from Robert Gibby Brand, our featured musician. 

Click to view informative and inspiring short videos on our YouTube channel

Deborah Shouse is the author of Connecting in the Land of Dementia: Creative Activities to Explore Together and Love in the Land of Dementia: Finding Hope in the Caregiver’s Journey.

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The Stamp of Fundraising for Dementia: Kudos to Lynda Everman and Kathy Siggins

I am always delighted to get an update from Lynda and Kathy. For years, they promoted the idea of a semi-postal stamp for Alzheimer’s, a stamp that would cost a little more and raise money for the cause. They had to be persistent, dedicated, connective, tireless, creative, and patient. They were.

Their stamp was brought out in November 2017. I was one of the many who were elated. Those are the stamps I buy. I feel joy each time I mail a letter with that semi-postal, knowing that I am raising awareness and money. 

I am sending Lynda’s recent updates. I hope you’ll join me in ordering more stamps right now and in encouraging your representatives to support this stamp, as they can extend the life of the stamp. Lynda and Kathy are an example of how two people, enlisting the support of hundreds of others, can make a dramatic difference. Follow your heart into making your own difference.

Warmly,

Deborah

From Lynda: 

As of the end of February, 6 million Alzheimer’s stamps have been sold to raise $840,000 for NIH funded dementia research: https://about.usps.com/corporate-social-responsibility/semipostals.htm

The sales period for the Alzheimer’s semipostal stamp is time-limited….  The Alzheimer’s stamp which was first issued on November 30, 2017 will be removed from sale on November 30, 2019.

Let’s see what we can do to EXCEED $1 million raised for NIH funded Alzheimer’s research by November 30th! Please keep purchasing and promoting the stamp which is available at most post offices, online at https://store.usps.com/store/product/buy-stamps/alzheimers-S_564204  and by toll-free phone order at 1-800 STAMP-24.

Here’s another update: 

Hello friends,

I am using this tremendous resource from the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM) to reach out to the health legislative staff of all 535 members of Congress urging all to co-sponsor legislation (H.R. 3113 and S. 1728) requiring the USPS to extend sales of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Semipostal Stamp for an additional 6 years. 

But I need your help! If you’ve not done so already, would you please call or email your Congressperson and Senators and ask for their support? Below are sample scripts/emails for you to use.

FOR CONGRESSPERSONS:

Request to Co-sponsor H.R. 3113

I want to to call attention to proposed bipartisan, bicameral legislation which, if passed, would extend the sales of the US Postal Service Alzheimer’s Disease Research Semipostal Stamp for an additional 6 years.  

In less than a year and a half on the market, the Alzheimer’s Stamp has raised over $890,000 for NIH funded research for better treatments, prevention and, one day, a cure for these  diseases which have caused too much suffering for far too long. However, despite the fact that 500 million stamps were printed (of which 6.5 million have been sold), without this legislation, all unsold stamps will be removed from sales at the end of November. The passage of this legislation will not increase the Congressional Budget; but it will allow all who use the U.S. mail to continue to voluntarily purchase these stamps to help raise public awareness and funds for critical research.  

Please join your colleagues in co-sponsoring H.R. 3113 “To require the United States Postal Service to sell the Alzheimer’s semipostal stamp for 6 additional years.”

Thank you.

FOR SENATORS:

Request to Co-sponsor S. 1728

I want to to call attention to proposed bipartisan, bicameral legislation which, if passed, would extend the sales of the US Postal Service Alzheimer’s Disease Research Semipostal Stamp for an additional 6 years.  

In less than a year and a half on the market, the Alzheimer’s Stamp has raised over $890,000 for NIH funded research for better treatments, prevention and, one day, a cure for these  diseases which have caused too much suffering for far too long. However, despite the fact that 500 million stamps were printed (of which 6.5 million have been sold), without this legislation, all unsold stamps will be removed from sales at the end of November. The passage of this legislation will not increase the Congressional Budget; but it will allow all who use the U.S. mail to continue to voluntarily purchase these stamps to help raise public awareness and funds for critical research.  

Please join your colleagues in co-sponsoring S. 1728 “A bill to require the United States Postal Service to sell the Alzheimer’s semipostal stamp for 6 additional years.” 

Click to view informative and inspiring short videos on our YouTube channel

Deborah Shouse is the author of Connecting in the Land of Dementia: Creative Activities to Explore Together and Love in the Land of Dementia: Finding Hope in the Caregiver’s Journey.

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Talking about Dementia with Teens

We were delighted to spend time with the bright and curious sixth and seventh graders in Mary Silwance’s class at KC Academy. They had read the young adult novel Hour of the Bees, which features a poignant relationship between a pre-teen girl and her grandfather who is living with dementia, and they wanted to learn more. During our short time together, talking about dementia with teens, we discussed:

  • How it might feel for people who are living with dementia
  • Stigma and stereotypes
  • Creativity and dementia
  • Becoming an advocate

Here are a few excerpts from our lively conversation: 

How many of you have ever misplaced something? How did you feel when you couldn’t find it?

How many of you have ever forgotten what you were going to say? 

Have any of you ever overslept, woken up in a panic, and not known what day it was?

Those kinds of issues happen to most of us, at least occasionally. 

But imagine how you would feel if they started happening all the time. You kept misplacing your cell phone, your homework, your library books. You couldn’t remember your address or your teacher’s name.  What if you raised your hand to answer a question at school and the words you were going to say just disappeared. Or they came out all jumbled up? What if it happened so often that you started to worry about talking and became more and more quiet?

These are a few of the things that people who are living with dementia have to cope with.

With most illnesses, people cluster around and want to help you. But some people with memory loss actually lose their friends. We know dementia is not contagious, so why would people shy away?

People are scared when their friends and family members start changing. They’re worried they won’t know what to say or how to communicate. They’re worried about making a mistake. But the only mistake is abandoning a person you care about.

Lots of people are working together to make life better for those who are living with dementia. And some are those are people who are living with dementia. They say, “Nothing about us without us,” which means, “Don’t make plans about our lives without consulting us.” 

How you can be an advocate

  • Watch your language. Don’t use the words victim or sufferer with Alzheimer’s or dementia. These are strong and courageous people dealing with a brain disease.  
  • Look for opportunities to spend time with people who are living with dementia.
  • Don’t worry if you don’t know what to say. Look at the person. If they’re in a wheelchair or chair, bend or kneel so you can have eye contact. 
  • Try to find a quiet place to talk and listen. Some people are overwhelmed by too much noise.
  • Remember to slow down because some people need extra time to answer questions.
  • Seek ways to connect through arts and imagination, including music, drawing, cooking, gardening, and flower arranging.

Click here to experience part of the conversation 

Click to view informative and inspiring short videos on our YouTube channel

Deborah Shouse is the author of Connecting in the Land of Dementia: Creative Activities to Explore Together and Love in the Land of Dementia: Finding Hope in the Caregiver’s Journey.

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Come Have a Ball with Us!

Explore the fun of learning and playing Bocce Ball at our next Memory Cafe!

Help your neighborhood become more dementia friendly by attending our May 23rd Lunch and Learn. Please RSVP to heatherharrison@kclibrary.org

Click to view informative and inspiring short videos on our YouTube channel

Deborah Shouse is the author of Connecting in the Land of Dementia: Creative Activities to Explore Together and Love in the Land of Dementia: Finding Hope in the Caregiver’s Journey.

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Creating a Dementia Friendly Kansas City

Luck. Kismet. The stars aligning. Those are all valid descriptions of our April 5th event, Creating a Dementia Kansas City.

First, we were lucky to have two great speakers: Emily Kearns, PhD, formerly of Dementia Friendly Massachusetts and Michelle Niedens, from the University of Kansas Alzheimer’s Disease Center.

Then, a lovely splash of kismet  when Emily and April Roy, Director of the Plaza Library, were invited to join Gina Kaufmann on KCUR’s Central Standard.

Thanks to Central Standard and lots of grass roots marketing, almost 100 people attended from many different sectors. Our attendees included representatives from The Alzheimer’s Association, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, The Kansas City Symphony, The Renaissance Festival, KC Actors Theatre, The Naka-Kon Anime Convention, the Mayor’s office of Culture and Creative Services, as well as the medical and healthcare communities, senior services providers, the library community, first responders, faith communities, social work consortiums, people who are living with dementia and their friends and care partners, community volunteers, and more.

Our vision was beautifully articulated by our two speakers: “We envision Kansas City as a community where every citizen feels welcomed, valued, and engaged.”

We’ve only just begun and we welcome your support. 

 

 

Click on this link to enjoy a brief sampling of our Dementia Friendly Kansas City official launch

Click here to preview some inspiring action steps

Click to view informative and inspiring short videos on our YouTube channel

Please consider joining us for our follow through Lunch and Learns.

Deborah Shouse is the author of Connecting in the Land of Dementia: Creative Activities to Explore Together and Love in the Land of Dementia: Finding Hope in the Caregiver’s Journey.

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Animal Magnetism: The Zoo Cafe Attracts Almost 100 People!

The April 16th KC Memory Cafe started out quietly. People came in, silent, perhaps feeling a little confused or weary. After they sat down at comfortable tables and were served comforting snacks, the conversations increased. People enjoyed their oranges, animal crackers, and drinks. And then the dynamic duo from the Kansas City Zoo brought out the first attraction and the crowd got really engaged in the black and bright blue tree frog from South America. They peered through the glass container at the amphibian, tapped the glass to get his attention, and asked questions. The animal magnetism was working. 

With the introduction of the African Pygmy Hedgehog, the guests became even more animated. The hedge hog was undeniably adorable and everyone wanted a good look. “Where is he from?” “What does he eat?” “Will he bite?” people asked. And “Can I have another look at him?” 

When the parrot emerged from its covered cage, everyone grinned and clapped. The bird wowed the crowd by saying, “Hello,” clear as could be. When one of the educators passed around brilliantly colored feathers the parrot had shed, people avidly admired them.

The energy was buzzing as people left, buoyed by learning about these new animals and excited by the outing. 

“I will be back,” one woman promised.

“This was so well done,” a staff member told us.

“I loved the parrot,” another woman said.

What we all loved most was seeing our guests blossom and talk and come to life by experiencing such an interactive and engaging program. Many thanks to the Kansas City Zoo for sharing these remarkable educators and animals with us. And many thanks to our guests for attending. We hope to see you all at a future cafes.

Click here and enjoy watching the animal magnetism

Want to experience some animal magnetism at home?

If you have a pet, share the responsibilities of caring for it. Taking care of an animal offers a sense of purpose and invites out our nurturing spirits.

If you don’t have your own pet, invite a well behaved pet to visit. Select an animal you all like, ideally one you can pet and hold, such as a dog, cat, or bunny.  

Consider adding a spill-proof aquarium, featuring brightly colored fish. Watching the fish glide by can be soothing. 

Look for other opportunities to hold or connect with animals.

Come join us for our next Cafe:

Deborah Shouse is the author of Connecting in the Land of Dementia: Creative Activities to Explore Together and Love in the Land of Dementia: Finding Hope in the Caregiver’s Journey.

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